A Culture of Consent Does Not Mean

Having a Pro-Choice Philosophy regarding relationships with deities does not mean…

  • That everything is always easy
  • That the deity never makes any mistakes
  • That the mortals and deity are always nice
  • That the mortal and deity are equals
  • That no one is a slave or a sub in the relationship
  • That the deity isn’t allowed to represent their assigned part of the universe
  • That the deity has to stop being themselves for the mortal
  • That the deity doesn’t engage in whatever annoying personal habits they might have as a result of their personality.
  • That the deity wouldn’t be sad if the mortal left
  • That the relationship isn’t serious

It just means that the mortal and the deity are both there because they choose to be. End of statement.

It means that when a mortal is not being left alone by a deity when the answer is truly no, being dragged in a direction that isn’t healthy, or not being allowed to leave, this is considered a problem. It means that, as clergy people, we need to restore autonomy to the human, and dignity to the deity by resolving the problem in a way which ideally compromises neither.

4 comments

  1. aoibheall52

    How is that accomplished? What carrot works with a deity intent on getting his way? Especially if he honestly thinks it’s in the mortal’s best interest? Coz we can be mighty stubborn about things as well.

    • Thenea

      That is a really good topic for discussion.

      Unfortunately, my plan for how a community can extinguish this sort of phenomenon is complex, and much more in depth that can fit in a comment, but the short answer is: “Make this approach to making people recognize the mortal as being important to the deity the most inefficient path to doing so.”

  2. aoibheall52

    Meaning it’s a post unto itself. That will be a good one. You’ll get a lot of ideas from the readers about it. The only thing that can truly hold a deity back is himself and some lack that self control. Or so I’ve been told. I must say, I’m really glad I found your blog, Thenea.

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